Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures

School of Music

Research clusters

The School’s research clusters provide a creative academic context for PhD student supervision, collaborative research and impact building, and they also identify key themes within our research; Music as Culture; Music and Science and Making Music.

Music as culture

From 2014-2018 Steve Muir is leading an international team for the AHRC ‘Care for the Future’ Large Grant: Performing the Jewish Archive, a £1.5m interdisciplinary project.

James Mooney has won a £130k AHRC Fellowship to work on ‘Hugh Davies: Electronic Music Innovator’, 2015-16

David Cooper’s book Béla Bartók was released in 2015 by Yale University Press

Derek Scott’s German operetta project is supported by 1million Euros of European Research Council funding.

In 2014 Lady Gaga and Popular Music: Performing Gender, Fashion, and Culture, edited by Martin Iddon and Melanie Marshall was published by Routledge

Ed Venn was awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship in 2013 for work on Thomas Adès’s Asyla

Michael Allis published Temporaries and Eternals: the Music Criticism of Aldous Huxley, 1922-23 in 2013

Music and science

David Cooper, Ian Sapiro and Laura Anderson are working on the Trevor Jones film music project , supported by £570k of AHRC funding.

Alinka Greasley has been awarded a £247k AHRC Early Career award for ‘Hearing aids for music: exploring the music listening behaviour of people with hearing impairments’.

Alex McLean and Kia Ng’s Weaving Codes, Coding Weaves is an 18-month AHRC Digital Transformations Amplification project, involving live coding of music and collaboration with partners in design and textiles, in Denmark, Nottingham, Aarhus and Munich.

Karen Burland has been awarded a BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grant for ‘Musical Leisure: Exploring Identities at Work and Play’.

Making music

Clive Brown received a large AHRC grant for work on 19th- and early 20th-century annotated editions of string music (bibliographical problems, editorial content and implications for performance practice), leading the CHASE project team.

Mic Spencer, Scott McLaughlin, Ewan Stefani and Martin Iddon have had compositions performed in Copenhagen, Vancouver, Paris, San Francisco, New York, Stuttgart, Glasgow, Darmstadt, Freiburg, Huddersfield (HCMF); they have worked with and been performed by artists such as Bozzini Quartet, Duo Contour, Ensemble Modelo62hand werk, loadbang+, Trio Atem, Trio Scordatura, Diego Castro (guitar), John Eckhardt (bass)Paul Hession (drums), Nina Whiteman (voice), Eva Zöllner (accordion), and broadcast by the BBC.

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