Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures

School of Music

Dr Karen Burland

Head of School and Associate Professor of Music Psychology

0113 343 2579

School of Music, room G.03

Office hours: Tuesday 12.30-1.30pm, Friday 10-11am

BMus (Hons), MA,PGCAP, PhD

Dr Karen Burland was appointed to the staff at Leeds in 2005. She is currently Head of the School of Music. Karen has published book chapters and journal articles focusing on musical development, musical identities, the transition between higher education and performance/non-performance professions, audience participation in live events, and the benefits of music technology in music therapy. Karen is currently a University Student Education Fellow.

Biography

Karen studied as an undergraduate and postgraduate at the University of Sheffield and finished her PhD in January 2005. During her postgraduate studies Karen worked as a visiting lecturer at The University of Leeds and The University of Sheffield and was a research assistant for Dr Stephanie Pitts (on PALATINE and British Academy funded projects) and Professors Eric Clarke and Nicholas Cook (British Academy funded project). Karen also teaches the clarinet and saxophone and is an active performer, playing principal clarinet with Hallam Sinfonia, and baritone saxophone with Saxsational saxophone quartet, Middlewood Sessions, and Langsett Dance Band.

Research Interests

  • Musical identities
  • Musical development
  • Music Therapy and Music Technology
  • Audience experience

Musical development

Karen’s research in this area focuses specifically on the environmental conditions leading to childhood musical success and the professional development of musicians during their career transitions. In particular Karen is interested in how musicians cope with their transitions from training in Higher Education to entering a performance or non-performance based career. Karen was awarded the prestigious Uchida Fellowship in 2002 which enabled her to conduct similar research in Japan for a short period of time: she is currently working on the report of her findings. Karen has also investigated creativity and the influence of different group settings on the quality of children’s group compositions.

Musical identities

Karen’s current research activity focuses on musical identities: she argues that musicians possess either a professional or amateur musical identity which influences their career choices. She has recently worked with Dr Luke Windsor (University of Leeds) to investigate how an individual’s musical identity is presented in performance. Karen has recently started a new longitudinal study entitled The art of nu-jazz: investigating the process, experience and impact of collaborative studio projects in which she is exploring the musical identities of musicians creating and performing music which is based in a studio environment.

Audience experience

Karen worked with Dr Stephanie Pitts (University of Sheffield) on a British Academy funded project investigating the roles and experiences of listeners at a chamber music festival. They have subsequently worked on a project funded by the British Academy investigating audience experience at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues festival; investigating identity, community and participation, which was followed up by a case study of a small, prestigious jazz club in Oxford – ‘The Spin’. Karen and Stephanie have an edited book called ‘Coughing and Clapping: Investigating Audience Experience’ was published with Ashgate in November 2014.

Music Therapy and Music Technology

Karen has worked with Dr Wendy Magee (Temple University) on a project investigating music therapists use of music technology in therapeutic settings. The research explored the ways in which therapists are working with music technology and the ways in which it enhances the therapeutic process.

Teaching

  • Current Modules
  • MUSS1520 Introduction to the Sciences of Music
  • MUSS2920 Psychology of Listening and Performance
  • MUSS2925 Music Students into Schools
  • MUSS3940 Music Psychology
  • MUSS3140 Minor/Major Dissertation
  • MUSS5931 Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music
  • MUSS5932 Research Techniques in the Applied Psychology of Music.

 

Responsibilities

Head of School

Director of Music Alumni Network.

Publications

Books

  • Burland K, Pitts S (2016). Coughing and Clapping: Investigating Audience Experience. Routledge.

Journal articles

  • Burland K, McLean A (2016). Understanding live coding events. International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media. 12(2), 139-151.
    DOI: 10.1080/14794713.2016.1227596, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/109223/

  • Sapiro DJ, Windsor WL, Burland K (2013). Musical Recall Enables Playing by Ear Ability in Trained Pianists. Music Perception. . (In preparation)

  • Burland K, Magee WM (2013). Developing identities using music technology in therapeutic settings. Psychology of Music. . (Accepted)

  • Pitts SE, Burland K (2013). Listening to live jazz: an individual or social act?. Arts Marketing: An International Journal. , 7-20.

  • Burland K, Pitts S (2012). Rules and expectations of jazz gigs. Social Semiotics. 22(5), 523-543.
    DOI: 10.1080/10350330.2012.731895

  • Burland K (2011). The art of nu-jazz: understanding identity and collaboration in creative studio projects. In preparation. . (In preparation)

  • Burland K (2011). University to Career transitions: finding a musical identity. In preparation. . (In preparation)

  • Burland K (2010). The Social and Applied Psychology of Music. BRIT J MUSIC EDUC. 27(1), 101-103.

  • Burland K, Pitts SE (2010). Understanding Jazz Audiences: Listening and Learning at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival. J NEW MUSIC RES. 39(2), 125-134.
    DOI: 10.1080/09298215.2010.493613

  • Magee WL, Burland K (2008). Using electronic music technologies in clinical practice: opportunities, limitations and clinical indicators. British Journal of Music Therapy. 22(1), 3-15.

  • Magee WL, Burland K (2008). An Exploratory Study of the Use of Electronic Music Technologies in Clinical Music Therapy. NORD J MUSIC THER. 17(2), 124-141.

  • Burland K, Pitts SE (2007). Becoming a music student: investigating the skills and attitudes of students beginning a music degree. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. 6(3), 289-308.

  • Magee WL, Burland K (2007). Identifying treatment process in the clinical application of electronic music technologies with complex disabilities. Clinical Rehabilitation. 21(12), 1145-1146.

  • Burland K (2006). Review of The Reflective Conservatoire: Research Studies in Music Education 4. British Journal of Music Education. 23(3), 365-368.

  • Burland K, Davidson JW (2004). The role of parents in the development of the professional classical musician. Sciences et Techniques en Activites Physiques et Sportives. Special Edition. 64, 89-108.

  • Moore DG, Burland K, Davidson JW (2003). The social context of musical success: A developmental account. British Journal of Psychology. 94(4), 529-549.
    DOI: 10.1348/000712603322503088

  • Burland K, Davidson JW (2002). Training the Talented. Music Education Research. 4(1), 121-140.

  • Burland K, Davidson JW (2001). Investigating Social Processes in Group Musical Composition. Research Studies in Music Education. 16, 46-56.

Chapters

  • Burland K, Spencer M, Windsor L (2017). Exploring, enhancing and evaluating musical 'doctorateness': perspectives on performance and composition. In Nilsson F, Dunin-Woyseth H & Janssens N (Ed.) Perspectives on Research Assessment in Architecture and the Arts: Discussing Doctorateness(114-128) Routledge Research in Architecture. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge.
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/116970/

  • Burland K, Windsor WL (2014). Moving the gong: exploring the contexts of improvisation and composition. In Burland, K & Pitts S (Ed.) Coughing and Clapping: Investigating Audience Experience(101-114)Farnham: Ashgate.
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/80974/

  • Davidson JW, Burland K (2006). Musician Identity Formation. In McPherson GE (Ed.) The Child as Musician: A handbook of musical development(475-490)Oxford University Press.

  • Burland K, Davidson JW (2004). Tracing a Musical Life Transition. In Davidson JW (Ed.) The Music Practitioner(225-250)Ashgate Publishing Limited.

  • Burland K Music technology in therapy and its relevance to identity. In Magee WM (Ed.) Music Therapy in Health and Therapeutic Settings()Jessica Kingsley. (In preparation)

  • Burland K, Pitts SE Understanding festival audiences. In Lamont A (Ed.) Choosing Music: the contexts, motivations, processes and effects of music listening()Oxford University Press. (In preparation)

Conference papers

  • Burland K, Pitts SE ‘Understanding Jazz Audiences: a case study of 'The Spin', Oxford’ Business of Live Music, University of Edinburgh, U.K., 01/04/2011 (Unpublished)

  • Burland K, Pitts SE ‘Audience Experiences at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival’ Leeds International Jazz Conference, Leeds College of Music, Leeds, 01/04/2008

  • Burland K, Windsor L ‘Performing Musical Identities’ PERFORMA (Conference on Performance Studies), Department of Communicationa and Art, Aveiro, Portugal, 01/01/2007

  • Magee WL, Burland K ‘Identifying treatment process in the clinical application of electronic music technologies with complex disabilities’ Winter meeting of the Society for Research in Rehabilitation, Sheffield, 01/01/2007

  • Magee WL, Burland K ‘Integrating electronic music technologies in music therapy practice: results of a qualitative investigation’ Composition and computer-assisted music-making, Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research, Birmingham, 01/01/2007

  • Magee WL, Burland K ‘A systematic qualitative study of the application of electronic music technologies in clinical music therapy’ Joint summer meeting of the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine and The Society for Research in Rehabilitation, London, 01/01/2006

  • Burland K ‘University to career transitions: finding a musical identity’ Ninth International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition, University of Bologna, Italy, 22/08/2006

  • Windsor L, Burland K ‘Communicating a musical identity’ Music and Gesture 2, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, 01/01/2006 (Unpublished)

  • Magee W, Burland K ‘Integrating electronic music technologies in music therapy practice: preliminary findings of a research study’. In British Society of Music Therapy Annual Conference, LondonBritish Society of Music Therapy Annual Conference, London..

  • Burland K ‘A Tale of the Unexpected...? A study of undergraduate music students beginning a career transition’. In The Fourth International Research in Music Education Conference, ExeterThe Fourth International Research in Music Education Conference, Exeter..

  • Burland K ‘The Professional and Amateur Musical Identity’. In Eighth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition.Eighth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition...

  • Burland K, Davidson JW ‘Musical Life Transitions: Teenage to Adult Professional Involvement’. In Eighth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, ChicagoEighth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Chicago..

  • Burland K ‘The emerging 'performer' identity’. In Fifth Triennial European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music Conference, Hanover, GermanyFifth Triennial European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music Conference, Hanover, Germany..

  • Moore DG, Davidson JW, Burland K ‘Which childhood factors contribute to adult professional musical involvement?’. In Seventh International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sydney, Australia.Seventh International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sydney, Australia...

  • Burland K ‘Influential factors in professional musical development’. In Seventh International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sydney, AustraliaSeventh International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sydney, Australia..

  • Burland K, Davidson JW ‘Training the Talented’. In The Second International Research in Music Education Conference, ExeterThe Second International Research in Music Education Conference, Exeter..

  • Burland K ‘The creative and collaborative music identity: investigating different social approaches to musical composition’. In Sixth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, KeeleSixth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Keele..

Reports

  • Magee WL, Burland K (2006). Exploring the use of electronic music technologies in clinical music therapy: Establishing definitions and scope of practice. Final Report. London: Royal Hospital for Neuro-Disability.

Others

  • Burland K (2003). The role of peers in musical development. EPTA Piano Professional. . 2, 14-14.

Research Projects & Grants

  • The British Academy Small Research Grant, July December 2007 Audience experience at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues festival: investigating identity, community and participation (4974).
  • The Japan Foundation Uchida Fellowship, March 2002 May 2002. Investigating cultural differences in the emerging performer identity (5,000).

External Appointments

Reviews Editor for British Journal of Music Education

  • Reviewer for Psychology of Music, British Journal of Music Education, Leverhulme, Ashgate and Oxford University Press
  • Treasurer for SEMPRE

PhD & Postdoctoral Supervision

Current Research Students

  • Claire Slight (jointly supervised with Dr Luke Windsor): “Exploring the university to career transitions of UK music postgraduate students”
  • Liz Brooker (jointly supervised with Dr Luke Windsor): “Music performance anxiety:  an investigative study into the efficacy of innovative interventions when applied to piano students at undergraduate level”
  • Albini Saragu (jointly supervised with Dr Luke Windsor): “Designing Children’s Music Activities using Multicultural Musical Resources”
  • Mary Black (jointly supervised with Dr Bryan White): ‘Singing is like pole vaulting’: the use and effect of imagery in choral conducting.
  • Dorien Schampaert (jointly supervised with Dr James Mooney): “Expressive Electricity:a study of the Ondes Martenot in use, practice and culture”

Past PhD students

  • Diane Sapiro (jointly supervised with Dr Luke Windsor): An investigation into the psychological processes that facilitate playing the piano by ear
  • Emilee Simmons (jointly supervised with Dr Kevin Dawe): REM and the Alternative
  • Maureen Mather (jointly supervised with Dr Luke Windsor): An investigation into the use of music to support non-musical learning goals within mainstream learning support settings

PhD Thesis

Becoming a musician: a longitudinal study investigating the career transitions of undergraduate music students

This thesis examines the nature of the transition between training as an undergraduate musician and choosing whether or not to pursue a career as a professional performer. Previous studies of musical development have focused on childrens skill acquisition, but few have considered the roles of motivation, practice, and the social environment in the transition into the music profession. Musicians making early career choices are also progressing through one of the most critical life-span changes from adolescence to young adulthood and little is known about how the psychological changes occurring during this time influence a musicians development.

A two-year longitudinal study was conducted with a group of 32 musicians who, at the beginning of the study, were undergraduate music students attending either a British music college or university. Eight interviews were conducted with each of the participants. These were primarily qualitative in design, being either structured or semi-structured and the data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques. The findings indicate that distinct characteristics defined the musicians who chose to pursue a professional performance career which differed from those for whom music became an amateur interest. The results suggest that the four factors of motivation, musical identity, learning styles and coping strategies interact and influence the career choices of the musicians. It is suggested that an individuals musical identity and his/her coping strategies play an integral role in the process of becoming a professional or amateur musician. A Dynamic Model of Musical Identity Formation and Career Choice is proposed in order to depict and explain the complex process of becoming a professional or amateur musician in adulthood.

PDF download (1.65 MB)

Professional Practice

Saxsational Saxophone Quartet (Baritone Saxophone)

  • Hallam Sinfonia (Clarinet)
  • Middlewood Sessions (Baritone Saxophone)
  • Langsett Dance Orchestra (Baritone Saxophone)

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