Faculty of Performance, Visual Arts and Communications

School of Music

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Dr Alinka Greasley

Associate Professor of Music Psychology, Programme Leader (MA Applied Psychology of Music)

0113 343 4560

School of Music, Room 1.13

Office hours: Friday 4-5pm (Sem1), Thursday 9-10 (Sem2)

BSc, PhD, PGCLTHE, CPsychol, MBPsS, FHEA

Alinka Greasley joined Leeds in 2009 having studied in the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University (BSc in Human Psychology), and completed her doctorate in the School of Psychology at Keele University (PhD in Music Psychology). She specialises in social-psychological research into everyday musical behaviour, using quantitative and qualitative approaches, and her current research focuses on how hearing impairments and the use of hearing aid technology affect music perception. Alinka is also a violinist, pianist and drum ‘n’ bass DJ.

Biography

Alinka Greasley studied as an undergraduate at Aston University (BSc Human Psychology) and completed her postgraduate studies at Keele University (PhD in Psychology of Music) under the supervision of Dr Alexandra Lamont and Prof. John Sloboda. During her PhD, Alinka taught psychology undergraduates at Aston and Keele Universites, and completed a PGCert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. After a year of postdoctoral work at Keele, she joined the School of Music at Leeds as Lecturer in Music Psychology. Alinka had also held posts as Academic Tutor at the Royal Northern College of Music and Research Consultant at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Research Interests

Music listening behaviour

Musical preferences

Personal music collections

Musicians’ health and well-being

Electronic dance music culture

DJ performance practice

Recent publications

Greasley, A. E. (forthcoming). Commentary on Solberg and Jensenius (2016) Investigation of intersubjectively embodied experience in a controlled electronic dance music setting. Empirical Musicology Review.

MacCutcheon, D., Elliott, M. & Greasley, A. E. (forthcoming). Investigating the value of DJing for contemporary music education. Dancecult: Journal of Electronic Dance Music Culture.

Fulford, R. J., Greasley, A. E. & Crook, H. (2016). Music amplification using hearing aids. Acoustic Bulletin, 41(1), 49-51.

Greasley, A. E. & Lamont, A. (2016). Musical Preferences. In S. Hallam, I. Cross & M. Thaut. (Eds.) Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology (2nd Edition).(pp. 263-284) Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Greasley, A. E. & Gardiner, C. E. (2015). A survey exploration of the links between levels of musical training and music listening behaviour. Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, August 2015, Manchester, UK.

Conferences

Greasley, A. E., Fulford, R. J., Hamilton, N. Pickard, M. (July 2016). Help Musicians UK Hearing Survey: Musicians’ hearing and hearing protection. Paper presented at the International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition, ICMPC14, San Francisco, USA.

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H, Fulford, R. J. & Salter, J. (July 2016). Insights into the complexities of music listening for hearing aid users. Paper presented at the International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition, ICMPC14, San Francisco, USA.

Mawby, S., Burland, K & Greasley, A. E. (July 2016). Including everyone: Music in the lives of children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities. Poster presented at the International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition, ICMPC14, San Francisco, USA.

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H. & Fulford, R. J. (2016). A clinical survey exploring the effects of hearing aid use on musical engagement and quality of life. Paper presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Nottingham, UK. Programme

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H. & Fulford, R. J. (2015). Hearing aids for music: initial findings from a clinic questionnaire. Poster presented at the British Academy of Audiologists, ICC, Harrogate, UK.

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H. & Fulford, R. J. (2015). A clinical survey exploring the effects of hearing aid use on musical engagement and quality of life. Paper presented at the SEMPRE Music and Health conference, Glasgow, UK (22nd Oct 2015).

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H. & Fulford, R. J. (2015). Hearing aids for music: initial findings from a clinic questionnaire. Poster presented at the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), RNCM, UK.

Greasley, A. E. & Gardiner, C. E. (2015). A survey study of the links between levels of musical training and music listening behaviour. Paper presented at the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), RNCM, UK.

Fulford, R. J., Ginsborg, J. & Greasley, A. E. (2015). Uses and experiences of hearing aid technology by musicians with a hearing impairment. Paper presented at the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), RNCM, UK.

Greasley, A. E., Crook, H. & Fulford, R. J. (2015). Hearing aids for music: preliminary insights from a clinical questionnaire study. Paper presented at the Hearing Impairment and the Enjoyment and Performance of Music event, 9 July 2015, Institute of Acoustics, Kingston University

Norton, N.C., Ginsborg, J., & Greasley, A.E. (2015). The Other Side of the Coin: Promoting the Well-Being of Musicians by Investigating Instrumental and Vocal Teachers’ Perspectives on Health Education. Paper presented at the Reflective Conservatoire Conference, Guildhall School of Music and Drama, UK.

Greasley, A. E. & Prior, H. (2014). Shaping popular music. Paper presented at the Performance Studies Network 3rd International Conference, University of Cambridge, UK.

Norton, N.C., Ginsborg, J., & Greasley, A.E. (2014). Health education in instrumental and vocal music lessons: The teacher’s perspective. Paper presented at the International Society for Music Education World Conference, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

MacCutcheon, D., Elliott, M. & Greasley, A. E. (2014). Drop the Beat: A comparison of DJs’ versus classical string musicians’ ability to synchronise to competing auditory metronomes. Paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, Birmingham.

Greasley, A. E. & Woodward, S. (2013). Personal collections and biography: a comparison of clothing and music. Paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, Harrogate.

Norton, N.C. & Greasley, A.E. (2013). Instrumental and vocal teachers as health promotion advocates. Paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, Harrogate.

Sloboda, J. A. & Greasley, A. E. (2012). Evaluation of a programme to motivate 16-24 years old to attend classical concerts as audience members. Paper presented at SEMPRE 40th Anniversary conference, London.

Greasley, A. E. & Prior, H. (2012). Mix tapes and turntablism: DJs’ perspectives on musical shape. Poster presented at the CMPCP Music and Shape conference, London. http://www.cmpcp.ac.uk/Greasley_Prior.pdf

Norton, N. C. & Greasley, A. E. (2012). Joint Hypermobility in Musical Environments. Poster presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, London.

Greasley, A. E. & Sloboda, J. A. (2012). Igniting the passion: Exploring attitudes towards classical music. Paper presented at the 3rd Reflective Conservatoire conference: Performing at the Heart of Knowledge, London.

Greasley, A. E., Gardiner, C. E. & Mitchell, L. A. (2011). A survey exploration of the links between musical training and everyday music listening behaviour.  Paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, Glasgow.

Lamont, A., Greasley, A. E. & Hale, R. (2010).  Strong experiences of music: the importance of popular music festivals in adults’ lives.  Paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition,Seattle,USA:University ofWashington.

Greasley, A. E. (2010).  Levels of engagement with music in everyday life. Poster presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference,Stratford-upon-Avon.

Lamont, A. & Greasley, A. E. (2010).  Self-regulated exposure to familiar music in everyday life.  Paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference,Stratford-upon-Avon.

Greasley, A. E. (2010).  Musical preferences across the lifespan: choosing styles, reflecting identities. Paper presented at the SEMPRE Music, Identity and Social Interaction Conference, RNCM.

Lamont, A. & Greasley, A. E. (2009). Keeping it fresh: How listeners regulate their own exposure to familiar music. Paper presented at the SEMPRE Music and Familiarity Conference,UniversityofHull.

Lamont, A., Sloboda, J. A., Greasley, A. E., Sargeant, S., Parker, C., Chambers, P., & Murgatroyd, M. (2009). Self-reported experiences of everyday music listening. Paper presented at the 7th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music,University of Jyväskylä,Finland.

Greasley, A. E. & Lamont, A. (2009). Exploring engagement with music using Experience Sampling Methodology. Poster presented at the 7th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music,University of Jyväskylä,Finland.

Greasley, A. E. & Lamont, A. (2008). Therapeutic uses of music in everyday life.  Paper presented at Music, Health and Happiness conference, RNCM,Manchester,UK.

Greasley, A. E., Parson, V., Manderson, K., Reddy, P. & Harrington, K. (2008).  Supporting students in the transition to university.  Workshop given at the international Psychology of Learning and Teaching conference,Bath,UK:UniversityofBath.

Greasley, A. E. & Lamont, A. (2006). Music preference in adulthood: why do we like the music we do? Paper presented at the 9th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition,Bologna,Italy:UniversityofBologna.

Reddy, P., Parson, V., Greasley, A. E., Elander, J., Norton, L. & Harrington, K. (2006). Becoming a psychology undergraduate: integrating study skills and integrating students.  Paper presented at the international Psychology of Learning and Teaching conference, York, UK: York St John University College.

Research Seminars

  • Department of Music, University of York, 10th May 2017
  • Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, 29th March 2017
  • School of Drama, Music and Screen, University of Hull, 8th March 2016
  • Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR), University of Southampton, 3rd November 2015
  • School of Music, University of Leeds, 15th October 2015
  • Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary’s, University of London, 29th April 2015
  • Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh, 21st November 2013
  • Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, 12th January 2011
  • Department of Psychology, Roehampton University, London, 7th December 2010
  • Department of Philosophy, University of Leeds, 10th November 2010
  • Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, London, 18th March 2010
  • School of Music, University of Leeds, 19th November 2009
  • Institute of Psychological Studies, University of Leeds 5th November 2009
  • Department of Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, 26th June 2009
  • Department of Sociology, University of Exeter, 29th November 2006

Teaching

Current Modules (2016/17)

  • MUSS1520 Introduction to the Sciences of Music
  • MUSS1820 Musical Encounters*
  • HPSC1070 Living with Technology
  • MUSS2325 Studies in Musical Performance
  • MUSS2920 Psychology of Listening and Performance*
  • MUSS3140 Dissertation
  • MUSS3940 Music Psychology*
  • MUSS3130 Individual Project
  • MUSS5030 Professional Studies
  • MUSS5162 Masters Dissertation
  • MUSS5931 Case Studies in Applied Psychology of Music
  • MUSS5932 Research Techniques in Applied Psychology of Music*

* = module leader

Other modules taught

  • MUSS1110 Music Research Skills
  • MUSS1030 Music in History and Culture

Responsibilities

Associate Professor in Music Psychology

Programme Leader (MA Applied Psychology of Music)(2012-2014, 2015 – present)

Admissions Tutor (UG)(2012 – 2015)

Admissions Tutor (TPG)(2013/14)

Member of Faculty Ethics Committee (PVAR FREC)(2013 – present)

Deputy Chair of PVAR FREC (2015 – present)

Publications

Journal articles

  • MacCuthcheon D, Elliott ME, Greasley AE (2016) “Investigating the value of DJing for contemporary music education and DJs’ sensorimotor synchronisation (SMS) abilities”, Dancecult : Journal of Electronic Dance Music Culture. (Accepted)
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/98781/

  • Fulford RJ, Greasley AE, Crook H (2015) “Music amplification using hearing aids”, Acoustics Bulletin. : 49-51. (Accepted)
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/98784/

  • Woodward S, Greasley A (2015) “Personal collections as material assemblages: a comparison of wardrobes and music collections”, Journal of Consumer Culture.
    DOI: 10.1177/1469540515611202, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89555/

  • Czajkowski A-ML, Greasley AE (2015) “Mindfulness for singers: The effects of a targeted mindfulness course on learning vocal technique”, British Journal of Music Education. 32.2: 211-233.
    DOI: 10.1017/S0265051715000145, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/90732/

  • Norton NC, Greasley AE (2014) “The BAPAM Student Advocate Scheme: Reflections on a Health Promotion Initiative at the University of Leeds.”, Journal of the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine. 2: 38-48.

  • Greasley AE, Lamont A, Sloboda JA (2013) “Exploring musical preferences: An in-depth study of adults' liking for music in their personal collections”, Qualitative Research in Psychology. 10.4: 402-427.

  • Greasley AE, Prior HM (2013) “Mixtapes and turntablism: DJs' perspectives on musical shape”, Empirical Musicology Review. 8.1: 23-43.

  • Greasley AE, Lamont A (2011) “Exploring engagement with music in everyday life using experience sampling methodology”, Musicae Scientiae. 15.1: 45-71.

  • Reddy P, Greasley AE, Parson V, Talcott J, Harrington K, Elander J (2008) “Becoming a Psychology Undergraduate: Integrating study skills and integrating students”, Psychology Learning and Teaching. 7.2: 38-41.

Chapters

  • Greasley AE, Lamont A (2016) “Musical Preferences”, In: Hallam S; Cross I; Thaut M (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology (Second Edition). Second. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89551/

  • Lamont A, Greasley AE, Sloboda JA (2016) “Choosing to hear music: motivation, process, and effect”, In: Hallam S; Cross I; Thaut M (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. 2nd. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780198722946.013.42, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89552/

  • Greasley AE, Lamont A (2013) “Keeping it fresh: How listeners regulate their own exposure to familiar music”, In: King E; Prior H (eds.) Music and Familiarity: Listening, Musicology and Performance. Ashgate. 13-31

  • Sloboda JA, Lamont A, Greasley AE (2009) “Choosing to hear music: motivation, process and effect”, In: Hallam S; Cross I; Thaut M (eds.) The Oxford handbook of music psychology. Oxford University Press, USA. 431-440

  • Lamont A, Greasley AE (2009) “Musical preferences”, In: Hallam S; Cross I; Thaut M (eds.) Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. 1. Oxford Handbooks. New York: Oxford University Press. 160-168
    DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199298457.013.0015, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/89553/

Research Projects & Grants

‘Hearing aids for music: exploring the music listening behaviour of people with hearing impairments’ (Principal Investigator), AHRC Early Career (Standard Route), £247,295 (FEC), 1st Feb 2015 – 31st Jan 2018

www.musicandhearingaids.org

External Appointments

Memberships 

  • Fellow, Higher Education Academy (FHEA)
  • Member, British Psychological Society (BPS), General and Qualitative Psychology Divisions
  • Member, Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research (SEMPRE)
  • Affiliate, Centre for Music Performance Research, RNCM

Reviewing (books)

  • Ashgate
  • Oxford University Press

Reviewing (journals)

  • Applied Psychology: An International Review
  • Empirical Musicology Review
  • Empirical Studies of the Arts
  • Music Perception
  • Psychology of Music
  • Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, & Brain
  • Popular Music
  • Qualitative Research in Psychology

Advisory Board – Help Musicians UK

PhD & Postdoctoral Supervision

PhD students (current):

Jamie Stephenson “Auditioning Ontology: Philosophical and Cultural Transitions in Sound, Technology, and Being” – with Dr James Mooney

Sarah Mawby “A cross-cultural exploration of the ways in which music education and music therapy are used in schools for children with special educational needs” – with Dr Karen Burland

Annie Czajkowski “Mindfulness for musicians: three tranformative interventions in music education” – with Professor Mike Allis

Claire Castle “The everyday music listening experiences of blind adults in the UK” – with Dr Karen Burland

Nellinne Perera “The role of leisure actvities in musicians’ health and well-being” with Professor Jane Ginsborg

PhD students (completed)

Naomi Norton (2016) “Music teachers’ perspectives on health education in instrumental and vocal lessons” – with Professor Jane Ginsborg

Will Baldry (2016) “Turntablist performance practice” (practice-led PhD) – with Dr Ewan Stefani

PhD Thesis

Engagement with music in everyday life: an in-depth study of adults’ musical preferences and listening behaviours

The purpose of this thesis is to explore the role of music in adults’ daily lives by exploring why they choose to listen to certain musical styles and pieces over others, and how and why they use their preferred music in everyday contexts. Whilst there has been a growth in the number of studies over the past two decades in music psychology exploring factors such as emotional responses to music, links between personality types and preferences, and uses of music in everyday contexts, no studies had hitherto provided insights into how such factors interrelate to explain what music means to people and how they choose to use it in a range of everyday settings to fulfil particular goals.

Adopting a phenomenological approach and employing mixed methods, a series of four empirical studies examined short- and long-term engagement with music with a sample of over 300 adults. These included an in-depth interview study to explore preference across the lifespan (long-term engagement), an Experience Sampling Methodology study to capture people’s music listening behaviour in real-life contexts (short-term engagement), and two smaller questionnaire studies providing data on preferences and patterns of engagement with music. Results highlight that music plays a central role in the majority of adults’ lives. However, levels of engagement with music fall along a spectrum, with clearly identifiable extremes of high and low engagement and some overlaps in the middle. These differences in engagement are accompanied by differences in explicit awareness of the uses and benefits of music listening in everyday life.

In the short term (e.g. on a day-to-day basis), music is shown to play a central role in people’s psychological well-being. Over longer timespans musical preferences continue to play a central role in the formation and maintenance of identities across the lifespan. The findings have important implications for the way in which musical preferences and listening behaviours are studied in subsequent music-psychological research, and also have broad implications for the study of complex psychological phenomena in psychology more generally. The thesis demonstrates how music holds a privileged position in the lives of the majority of adults, and highlights the powerful effects music can have physically, socially, intellectually, and emotionally.

Professional Practice

Classical music

  • Harrogate Philharmonic Orchestra (12-present)
  • Keele Philharmonic Orchestra (04-09), Leader (05-08)
  • North Staffordshire Symphony Orchestra (05-06)
  • Birmingham University Philharmonic Orchestra (01-03)
  • National Schools Symphony Orchestra (96-99)
  • IAPS National Orchestra (93-96)

Electronic dance music

Martial Arts

 

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